Archive : Tag

Brexit gets worse as London seeks to wriggle free from UK

POSTED ON June 30th  - POSTED IN Blog, Financial Regulation, Tax
London, going further offshore?

London, going further offshore?

Update: also see Anti-Tax, Anti-Regulation Sirens emerge after Brexit

We have our own particular reasons for disliking Brexit – the recent decision by the UK to leave the European Union. In a pre-Brexit analysis the Tax Justice Network quoted Adam Posen, director of the Peterson Institute for International Economics, who articulated a huge generic concern:

“If you’re anti-regulation fantasists to begin with, you start going down the path, ‘Oh we can become an even more offshore center. We can become the Cayman Islands writ large, or Panama writ large.’ And this frankly is the way I think this also spills over to the rest of the world, is that the UK decides, ‘Hey, regulatory arbitrage, letting AIG financial products run in London, actually destroyed the US financial system, but didn’t hurt us – made us a lot of money. Let us continue down this path. Let us be the ‘race to the bottom’ financial center. And I think this that’s where this going, because they’re not going to have any other option. It’s not good.”

Quote of the day: London’s super-rich

POSTED ON January 26th  - POSTED IN Blog, The Harms

Boris Johnson, a cheerleader for the Competitiveness Agenda

And the quote of the day is this one, via The Guardian newspaper and Professor Rowland Atkinson of Sheffield University, author of a two-year study of the super-rich in London.

“You can argue that the rich are a tax on everybody [else] in London”

This points to the Competitiveness Agenda and speaks to the (closely related) Finance Curse analysis.

Call for Papers – Should Nation States ‘Compete’?

POSTED ON March 6th  - POSTED IN Blog

City workshop

Call for papers for a Research Workshop

SHOULD NATION STATES ‘COMPETE’?

City University, London, 25th / 26th June 2015

The 2015 research workshop co-organised by the Association for Accountancy & Business AffairsCity University, and theTax Justice Network, will explore the notion of national ‘competitiveness’. This opens up possibilities for papers on a wide variety of themes, including tax wars (tax ‘competition’), the dynamics of ‘beggar-thy-neighbour’ politics, regulatory degradation, regulatory arbitrage, policy responses to ‘competitiveness’ pressures, and the impact of ‘competitiveness’ policies on home countries and third party countries.

Other related themes are likely to emerge as the workshop programme develops.

Offers of papers are especially welcome and early submission of an abstract of no longer than 300 words is encouraged. All submissions will be considered by the organising committee.

This workshop will bring together researchers, academics, journalists, policy staff of civil society organisations, consultants and professionals, elected politicians and/or their researchers, and government or international organisation officials.

The purpose of the workshop is to facilitate research through open-minded debate and discussion, and to generate ideas and proposals to inform and shape the political initiatives and campaigns already under way.

There will be a small charge for attendance at the Workshop. Participants are usually expected to finance their own travel although applications from students and others with limited means for bursary support will be considered.

More information about this workshop is available from: John Christensen, Tax Justice Network, john@taxjustice.net

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